What to do about an employment bond?

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What to do about an employment bond?

I received a job appointment letter from a potential employer. In the letter it states, “You have to provide duly notarized undertaking bonding yourself to work for our company for a minimum of 5 years from the date of joining”. There is no other information in the letter defining any requirements or penalties related to this bond, nor had the bond been discussed during multiple interviews and conversations. Is this legal? What is my liability if I choose to sign?

Asked on October 9, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, New Jersey

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I have never heard of any employer demanding an employment bond be posted by a potential employee. In order to fully answer your question I need to know the scope of the bond's performance and the amount in terms of dollars and cents to be bonded.

Such a requirement per custom and practice in the private and public work sector makes no sense. I suggest that you go down to your local department of labor and speak to one of its representatives about this requirement of your potential employer for a bond to be placed by you. At first blush although the bond requirement may not be illegal, such a requirement is most unusual where I would not want to work for this particular potential employer.


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