I may be suspected of ID theft. My ex tried to file for unemployment but was denied due to an open acct. having MY phone # with Ex’s SS# and address.

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

I may be suspected of ID theft. My ex tried to file for unemployment but was denied due to an open acct. having MY phone # with Ex’s SS# and address.

I called the unemployment office the next day; of the 2-3 databases that the mngr researched, my name, SS# and ph# were NOT found on any of my ex’s files. I let the officer know of my findings and asked WHO told him that my ph# was attached to my ex’s info. He said he had a couple sources, but didn’t state anything specific. Don’t I have a right to that info? And instead of the officer following up (like I felt he should have), he told the unemployment mngr that he was going on vacation and would follow up next week. Something doesn’t feel right. Do you think I should seek legal cousel?

Asked on May 8, 2009 under Criminal Law, Indiana

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

It's never a bad idea to talk to a lawyer, just to make sure.  It's like insurance -- even if you don't actually need it, the peace of mind is often worth the price.  You can look for one at our website, http://attorneypages.com

As long as the open account with your phone number isn't your doing, and you didn't get any money from it, you are probably not going to be in trouble, in the long run, although it may be a real pain in the pants for a while.

You probably don't have a right to information about an unemployment claim in your ex-wife's name.  And if your phone number also used to be your ex-wife's number, that's a simple explanation for how it got onto her claim, since that number might still have been in the files of people she worked for while you were still together.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption