Can I legally take action against my landlord for criminal negligence and the withholding of important information?

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Can I legally take action against my landlord for criminal negligence and the withholding of important information?

While coming back from vacation I was robbed, and the janitor had been fired. The only person who had access to my house and knew I was gone was the janitor. While asking the landlord why he was fired, she gave me false information and did not tell me the real reason (he was illegally taking cars out of the garage amongst other illegal stuff). Recently, it has been discovered that the key to my front door, a key I know sure she had before I left, is missing.She claimed that no one has access to they keys and no one has used them while I was on vacation when I first approached her about the robbery.

Asked on September 27, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Alaska

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First, there is no such thing as criminal negligence. All criminal actions are brought by law enforcement typically through the district attorney's office of the given county where an alleged crime occurred.

If you were robbed, you need to make a police report about the theft with law enforcement if you have not already. If you believe that the janitor employed by the landlord robbed you, you need to make further investigation to shore up your suspicions.

If you have evidence that the janitor did in fact rob you and he or she was an employee of your landlord, you have a basis for bringing an action against the landlord in addition to the janitor for the lost items based upon their fair market value as a civil lawsuit.

Good luck.


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