I’m renting a house with three other people, all of which are on the lease. How do i request to be let out of the lease?

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I’m renting a house with three other people, all of which are on the lease. How do i request to be let out of the lease?

One of the other tenants claims i owe money, and so she is harrassing me and trying to force me out of the house. The living situation has become unbearable and i now wish to be let out the lease to be able to reside elsewhere. She also will not give me information to contact the landlords and do not know how to go about geting this information to speak to them about this

Asked on June 5, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Virginia

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

A lease is a contract between the parties that signed it.  You have an obligation to pay under it.  Your question seems to be two-fold: how can I be let out of the lease and how can I find out the landlord's contact information. 

First, the owner of the property is listed on the deed filed in the county records office.  You can go down and look at the deed.  Although the landlord may be sympathetic to you they probably will not let you out of the lease unless the other tenants sign a new lease.  Someone needs to be responsible for your share of the rent to the landlord.  You could, though, at least ask for a copy of the lease you signed, which you will need eventually.

As for your room mate, you say that she is harassing you and trying to force you out.  You may wish to consult an attorney - once you have a copy of your lease - and see if he/she can do anything to advise you.  Harassment has different meanings on a day to day basis and in the legal world.  The attorney could either help try and stop the behaviour or help negotiate your release from the lease.  You can look here at attorneypages.com.  Good luck. 


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