How to interpret a parenting order?

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How to interpret a parenting order?

I recently got divorced and I am the non-custodial parent of 2 children. The parenting order specifically says that my ex-wife and I “shall each pay one half of after school care and/or daycare”. I interpreted this to mean that there is differentiation between she and I whenever daycare must be used for the care of the kids, and that we each will split the cost. However, her attorney says that the court interprets this to mean that I am solely responsible for daycare costs when it is during my visitation time. When daycare is used on her time, however, I am responsible for half the cost. Her attorney says “this is to prevent unscrupulous non-custodial parents from at-will running up childcare cost while the noncustodial parent receives 100% of the benefits of the childcare by receiving overtime wages or having nights out on the town”. I don’t see this as fair. And if this is how courts interpret it, why was it not written this way in the order. I’m very confused.

Asked on May 7, 2012 under Family Law, Georgia

Answers:

Shalamar Parham / Parham Law Firm, LLC

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Without reading the entire paragraph concerning daycare and looking at your child support worksheet, the plain language interpretation of the excerpt is that you each pay 50% regardless of which parent places your children in daycare or after school care.  

Good luck to you!

Shalamar Parham

Atlanta Divorce Attorney

 


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