If I’m being accused of stealing my lover’s credit card and using it to pay bills, what do I do if I was actually given permission to use it?

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If I’m being accused of stealing my lover’s credit card and using it to pay bills, what do I do if I was actually given permission to use it?

I have been having an affair with an older man for over a year. He has paid my bills and paid for school. He is now claiming that he didn’t give me permission to use his credit card and last months charges were charged back to my phone account. He says that the bill was too high and that he didn’t give me permission to use the card as much as I did. He has been acting different and I believe that he has now found another young girl for himself. I am just worried that criminal charges will be brought against me.

Asked on August 18, 2011 Virginia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If contacted by the authorities or arrested, get a criminal defense attorney--IMMEDIATELY. Don't talk to anyone, especially the authorities, until you've spoken with your lawyer (you have a right to not say anything). Ultimately, the issue will be can you disprove, or at least weaken, his assertions that you never had permission enough to avoid conviction. Towards that end, make sure you keep in a safe place all direct and  indirect evidence that you had permission.

Similarly, if not contacted by the authorities but if sued by him for the money he claims you owe, you would retain an attorney if you wanted to fight it...though if the amount is less than what hiring an attorney would cost, you might agree to repay him, but if yoiu do, make sure you get something in writing acknowledging that you are NOT agreeing that had no permission, but are paying simply to resolve a matter in the most expeditious way possible.


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