If I was being sexually harassed and coerced into doing other jobs, do I have a case?

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If I was being sexually harassed and coerced into doing other jobs, do I have a case?

I’m a security guard. I was harassed and coerced into working at a subcontracted shipping company but that wasn’t my job. I filed a complaint but I feel as though nothing was done. HR was made aware of everything and the said that an investigation would being conducted at both the shipping company side and my company side. Now, 3 weeks later, I’m told that the case has been closed and the other individual that was involved has been dealt with through company policy.

Asked on March 22, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Sexual harassment is illegal at work. If you believe that you have been sexually harassed at work, you could either contact the labor department--either state or federal--or else go to an employment law attorney and look to bring a lawsuit. Of course, bringing a lawsuit might not be worth it if you only suffered minimal economic losses (e.g. you weren't fired or paid less), since lawsuits are primarily designed to compensate for economic losses. You say that you were forced to work at a job which wasn't yours, but if you were paid what you would have earned otherwise, it's not clear how much you've been injured or damaged. Also, if the company did investigate and take appropriate remedial steps, that may mitigate their liability...therefore, going to the labor department might be a better route for this situation than looking to bring your own lawsuit.

 


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