If I lent my car to a friend’s 19 year old daughter who rear-ended another car, what should I do regarding an inspection of the brake line?

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If I lent my car to a friend’s 19 year old daughter who rear-ended another car, what should I do regarding an inspection of the brake line?

My car was totaled; she claims the brakes failed. However, I had been driving the car for months with no problems. The girl’s mother now wants to have the brake line inspected to help her daughter get out of the tickets that were issued. They live in another state but the accident took place in my state. ow do I proceed with this? My insurance wants this to be wrapped up, but I don’t know what to do. I want to help the family, but do not know anyone who can look at the vehicle. Do I suggest that she gets legal counsel who can then deal with the inspection?

Asked on June 3, 2015 under Accident Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You have the right to simply refuse the request, unless and only if she subpoenas an inspection or uses some other legal process to compel you to have the car inspected. Since the results of any inspection might be used to shift blame to you (e.g. that you were not maintaining the car properly), you might be best off refusing the request unless you receive some legal process--then if you do, you can at that point decide whether you are willing to retain an attorney to fight it or not. It is difficult to see how allowing the inspection will in any way help you.


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