What can I do to get my overtime wages?

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What can I do to get my overtime wages?

I just started working full time and working overtime due to the absence of our mananger. My first paycheck had over 10 hours of overtime for one week. I made sure with HR that it was ok for me in the following weeks to clock all the extra hours. She responded that they would make room in the budget. I ended up clocking in over 111 hours for the next pay period. The following Tuesday after the pay period ended, our HR pulled me aside and explained that they were switching me over to salary. I asked to confirm that it would be taking effect for the future pay periods when she laughed and joked about how no one should have to work 55 hours in a week. She explained that it would affect immediately.

Asked on October 29, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Minnesota

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

I suggest that you consult with a labor law attorney of a representative with your local department of labor if you do not want to be moved over to a salaried position but your employer insists upon such without increasing what you would be making compared to being hourly.

Meaning, if your salaried position is essentially the same hours as you working the hours with overtime for the pay that you make on a normal forty (40) hour week, what your employer is doing is a violation of your state's labor laws.


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