Who is responsible for informing a condo associationregarding new ownership of a unit?

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Who is responsible for informing a condo associationregarding new ownership of a unit?

Issue is when I moved in I was told I would get something in the mail when money was due but never did. When I contacted the collection lawyer they said that I never informed the association that I now own the property and that any communication sent from the association was likely forwarded to the previous owners. So instead of just owing my association fee ($375) I now owe a $200+ collection fee on top. Am I responsible for the $200+ fee? It seems like the association had the correct info if the collection lawyer could contact me.

Asked on April 11, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Listen something smells really fishy there in Florida. You mean to tell me that the condo association was never advised that there was a change in ownership?  Did you ever have to go before the condo board in order to be approved as a potential owner?  You mean to say that there was no attorney present at the closing representing the interest of the association?  I would not pay the fee unless and until I hired an attorney to help you with all of this.  Or better yet, call the attorney that represented you in the closing and ask what the heck is going on.  Something is not right here.  Get help.  Good luck.


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