If I signed a 4 year alarm system contract for protection for our home but we’re unexpectedly relocating, do we have to continue to pay?

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If I signed a 4 year alarm system contract for protection for our home but we’re unexpectedly relocating, do we have to continue to pay?

Earlier this year we, upon the belief would be remaining in our house for the foreseeable future signed a 4 year contract to an alarm provider (Vivint) which includes physical components of an alarmed system, and a monitoring service in the event of fire/invasion, etc. We’re now moving out of state at short notice due to my getting a new job but are told we have to continue paying even though we no longer will have the alarm system (physically we leave the equipment for the next owner) and will not be able to resume service at a rented home. Are we really on the hook for 3 years payments?

Asked on August 24, 2012 under General Practice, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You need to look at your contract.  Every contract has provisions for termination-- they may not tell you about them because they don't want an early termination.  So, your starting point is your contract.  Whatever your contract spells out for terminating the contract, you need to follow to the letter.  You may also want to go to the company's website and review their "frequently asked questions" section.  Often people will ask that question and they may have an answer that tips off how to do an early termination.  Or, if they represent that they will allow early termination for relocation, you may have a defense in that you signed a contract on a false representation.

If your contract has no such provisions then you may be stuck with the payment for the next three years. 


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