What to do if I have 2 warrants for my arrest for 2 missed court dates on 2 separate charges of Minor in Possession of Alcohol?

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What to do if I have 2 warrants for my arrest for 2 missed court dates on 2 separate charges of Minor in Possession of Alcohol?

The warrant has been active for about a year for each of them. And for one, it is the second time I have missed my court date. I have been unable to take care of this because I moved to another city and havent had time or money to travel back. There is a bond set for $500 on one and $250 for the other one. I know that I need to quash these by appearing at the court and rescheduling my court date. My question is: what will happen when I go in to the court? Will I be arrested or expected to post the bond?

Asked on March 26, 2013 under Criminal Law, Arizona

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If the judge is feeling sympathetic to your situation, then they could let you leave court without posting a bond-- however, the judge will be more inclined to help you if you appear in court prepared to take care of your MIP charge.  If your judge is strict, then there is a good chance he will have you arrested on the warrants and require you to post the bonds.  Considering that you have missed two court dates, this is a fairly strong possibility.  Judges are more forgiving of the first missed court date, and less forgiving of the second court date. 

I know you are strapped on cash, but this can potentially hinder you until you get it resolved.  Talk to a couple of different defense attorneys from that jurisdiction and see if they can get a plea worked for you that involves the warrant getting pulled.  This way, you save your funds for paying your MIP fine, instead of having to waste it paying for two bonds.  They may also help you smoothe things over with the judge. 


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