How does emancipation through the juvenile court work?

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How does emancipation through the juvenile court work?

I will be 16 in 71/2 months. I have been looking into emancipation since I was 13 years old. I really think I can handle getting it. I am looking for a job currently I am a good student and I am not a trouble maker. I just cannot stand my living conditions anymore. I will go more in depth of my reasoning for emancipation nnwhenit is needed. However. I would like to exactly what I would need to do to immediately file for emacipation on my 16th birthday? What requirements will I need to meet. Will I need a lawyer? Can I do this without my mother, who is my legal guardian, finding out?

Asked on June 21, 2012 under Family Law, Georgia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In order for a minor to obtain an order of emancipation essentially declaring him or her an adult for many issues in society, he or she must file a petition with the court seeking such serving the petition on his or her parents.

The petition must state a factual and realistic basis for the request and the minor must prove that he or she can support herself on their own.

Just because one is on a poor living condition does not create the legal basis for an order declaring a minor legally emancipated from his or her parents. Typically a trial is required where live testimony is presented where third parties such as teachers, siblings and relatives testify. I suggest that you consult with a family law attorney about the matter you are writing about.


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