What to do about a situation at work that violates EO laws?

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What to do about a situation at work that violates EO laws?

I am an Independent Contractor working for a company that supplies subject matter experts to the Dept of Defense for deployments to combat zones. I was told when I was hired that the job would be 3 weeks of training followed by a 6 month deployment overseas, where I would be making a significant amount of money to provide training to military personnel. I have now been working for the company for over a year and have not yet been deployed (therefore loosing money). I found out a few weeks ago that the reason I have not been deployed is because I am female. Should I speak with an employment law attorney? In Fairfax, VA.

Asked on February 1, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Virginia

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to review your contract and any advertisement about this position to know for certain whether what you described (combination of training and deployment) were guaranteed and if both were guaranteed, for how long and how long after training were you to be guaranteed to have been deployed at least once.  You need to find these provisions first, then contact a labor law lawyer who has significant experience with government contracts, especially with civilian personnel.  Further, you need to find the proof (preferably an email or letter or something similar) that unequivocally states the reason you are not being deployed is indeed because you are female.  Your attorney will then speak with you about what you to come out of this and then will work to get you the outcome if it is likely that outcome is reasonable.  


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