I have a general manager at work who continually harrasses me?

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I have a general manager at work who continually harrasses me?

He refuses to service accounts I sell, has written derogatory remarks about my performance in emails (which were “accidently” forwarded to me by my sales manager) and he is seriously affecting my paycheck, stress levels and reputation at work. I’m also 3 months pregnant, though this started prior to my pregnancy. Management and HR have yet to do anything regarding past complaints. Should I seek a lawyer?

Asked on January 8, 2013 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

As a general matter, a manager IS allowed to harass employees: the law does not require a manager to be professional, respectful, courteous, fair, etc. Rather, a manager can make make work as awful an experience as is imaginable.

The only exception is that the harassment cannot be aimed at you because of a specifically protected characteristic of yours; the main ones are sex, race, religion, age over 40, and disability. This does not mean that a woman, including, a pregnant woman, cannot experience harassment, just that she cannot be the target of the harassment simply because she is a woman (or pregnant). If you feel you are suffering this harassment because you are a woman or pregnant, you should speak with an employment law attorney or contact your state equal or civil rights agency.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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