How best to handle 2 out-of-state warrants?

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How best to handle 2 out-of-state warrants?

I have 2 outstanding warrants in the state of CO from 95 and 98. Both are larcency cases. I know I need to get these taken care of but I am unable to leave the state at this time; I have small children at home. Can I do a plea by mail? Do these effect me getting a drivers license? I don’t want this looming over my head any longer; its been too long. I own my mistakes, just want to stop letting my mistakes hold me down. I cannot afford an attorney so that isn’t an option.

Asked on September 13, 2010 under Criminal Law, Idaho

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You didn't give much by way of details.  Jailtime can, and probably will, be given in such a case. You will need to appear in CO since that is where the warrants were issued. You just can't "mail it in" as it were.  Since you have not yet been arrested, turning yourself in as opposed to appearing before the judge courtesy of the jail bus will be of help.  However not knowing the circumstances of your original conviction and the reason that you broke your probation it's hard to say what you can expect.  Retain an attorney in the area where all of this occurred.  They'll have local contacts with the court and will best be able to negotiate on your behalf.

One thing is for sure, do not ignore this situation. If you are stopped for even something as minor as jaywalking you will be taken into custody and most probably extradited.  Additionally, this will all turn up on an employment background check. And most certainly you put yourself at risk if you are going to apply for a driver's license. This is true no matter what state that you are now living in.

Consult with a CO attorney on this ASAP.  Since money is an issue, see if you qualify under the income guidelines for the Public Defender or Legal Aid.  If not see if they can recommend an attorney that may take the case "pro bono" (that is for free); many will volunteer their time for cases such as this.  Also, if there is a law school nearby to the court where the warrants were issued and checkto see if they run a free/low cost clinic; typically they do. Also, contact the local Bar Association in the applicable county; they may have a list of attorneys who will take your case "pro bono" (for free) or at least for a reduced fee based on your income/circumstances. 


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