What to do if I had an affair with my boss who is the sole owner/CEO of the company and I ended the affair but now my life is being made unbearable?

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What to do if I had an affair with my boss who is the sole owner/CEO of the company and I ended the affair but now my life is being made unbearable?

He will not communicate with me which prevents me from doing my job efficiently being that I am the HR Director and need to communicate with him. He has cut me off completely. I have worked for this company over four years without any reprimandsv/write ups. My record is excellent. The other day, he along with two other men gave me 3 final warnings at one time. I am being discriminated against for not sleeping with him any more.

Asked on October 14, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Alabama

Answers:

Michael A. Jacobson / Michael A. Jacobson, Law Office of

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In Washington State, a "quid pro quo" sex harassment case results when the Boss applies official penalties (eg. writeups) against you after you've ended a romantic affair in the interest of extracting another "installment" payment from you on his program to coerce you for additional sexual relations.   The boss' first line of defense is that romance and relations never happened, so your first attack is to point out emails or letters or the observiations of innocent bystanders (or treating psychologists or doctors)  which would say otherwise.   Even in cases where  the actual sexual conduct is not witnessed or written about,  the components parts leading up to a sexual encounter may be objectively demonstrated  (dinners and drinks out/  unusually excessive exlusive time behind closed doors at the office or during overnight stays out of town/ trips to the boss' home,  hotel receipts, etc)    The 2d half of the case is collecting third party observations showing that the criticisms written about in the performance memos are false statements where the truth of the matter has been observed by third party bystanders or in historical writings or emails to be quite different.   From a legal standpoint, resigning under pressure puts you at a distinct disadvantage and makes your proof harder to make,  compared with the scenario where the boss fires you.  There is no substitute for an assessment and full investigation from a trained N.E.L.A. employment lawyer.   Mike Jacobson

 

 


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