What to do about an ER bill if I left before treatment?

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What to do about an ER bill if I left before treatment?

I had a foot injury about 9 monhs ago and went to the ER of a hospital. I put my name in the waiting list, then waited for 45 min. to get called, but then I realized that my copay was $200 for ER, and decided to leave and go to a walk in care clinic. Then, 2 months ago, I went to buy a vehicle and found out that my credit score went down from 800 to 712. I went ahead and ordered my credit report and found out that I was turned over to a collection agency for not paying a $140 bill. I had no idea about the bill, so I called the collection agency and found out that the bill is from that hospital I mentioned above. I have not received any type of service from ER, except that they gave me an ice pack while waiting in the waiting area.

Asked on November 29, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Based upon what you have written you should contest the $140 bill that you received from the hospital that you have written about in that $140 for an ice pack is pretty steep. You need to contact the hospital's accounts receivables department and see what can be done to try and resolve the dispute. At worst scenario you may pay the $140 to get the mark off of your credit report and then sue the hospital in small claims court for the return of the $140.


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