If I got pulled over because the cop said I was doing 77 in a 55, can I fight this?

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If I got pulled over because the cop said I was doing 77 in a 55, can I fight this?

In the past Itook the consequences for speeding and paid the dues, however this one is iffy to me. I honestly don’t believe I was going that fast. Another thing is that I knew if I got another ticket my license could get suspended so if I saw him beforehand and slowed down why would I speed? It doesn’t make sense to me and I admit I don’t have a perfect driving record but I don’t think this is fair. He also didn’t make me sign the ticket if that makes a difference.

Asked on January 22, 2012 under General Practice, Colorado

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The odds of you prevailing are not good:

1) Almost always, the courts will believe the police officer over the driver, especially if he has a radar/laser gun reading.

(Note: if he had a radar/laser gun, by the time you saw him and started slowing, the gun would already have had a line of sight to you and could have already clocked your speed.)

2) You having not signed the ticket has no legal effect.

If you want to fight this, your best bet is to retain an experienced local attorney who specializes in speeding tickets and who knows the prosecutor, judge, etc. While he will probably not be able to completely eliminate the ticket, he may be able to at least reduce it to less points and a lower fine.


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