What to do if I got charged with retail theft and disorderly conduct?

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What to do if I got charged with retail theft and disorderly conduct?

On the back of citations it said that within 10 days I had to go the correspondent courthouse in order to pay the fine if the total amount wasn’t specified, which in my case it wasn’t. I didn’t go within those 10 days so now I got a letter on the mail saying that I pleaded not guilty and I have a court date now. The problem here is that I was going to plead guiltyand just pay the fines. Is there still any chance that I can go to my correspondent courthouse in order to plea guilty and pay he fines?

Asked on February 26, 2013 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you don't go enter a formal plea, then often the courts will enter one for you-- being a plea of not guilty.  Usually, you can go to the court, change the plea, and arrange for the payment of the fine.  You do need to get in touch with them since the 10 days has passed.  If you have failed to appear, the court may issue a capias for your arrest.

So... you need to call the clerk of the court and file an appearance. (some clerks will have website that have helpful forms and information)  You also want to get the name and contact information for the prosecutor handling your case.  You can contact them to arrange for a resolution of your case prior to the hearing date.  If you are not comfortable doing this, you can also hire an attorney to help you make the calls or enter the plea.


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