If I got bitten by a spider in my hotel bed and have been to the emergency room 3 times, do I have a case?

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If I got bitten by a spider in my hotel bed and have been to the emergency room 3 times, do I have a case?

My hotel sheets hadn’t been changed for 2 days. I made the staff aware twice before filing a

accident report. The bite was so infected I still can’t walk up right; I’m currently in pain using pain killers everyday and cream just to make it to work. Before I left, I wrote a detailed letter stating the dates and times of the incident and the current effect of the bite on my health.

Asked on August 6, 2017 under Personal Injury, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You may be able to sue the hotel: if they were not changing sheets or (presumably) cleaning the room as often as a hotel should, and as a result, there were pests, including the spider which bit you, that could be negligence, or unreasonable carelessness, and could make them liable for your out-of-pocket (not paid by insurance, Medicare or -caid, etc.) medical bills, lost wages, possibly some amount for pain and suffering for the life impairment, and other costs or losses flowing logically and predictably from the bite.
Unfortunately, if they will not voluntarily offer you compensation, a lawsuit would be the only way to get money from them, which means incurring the trouble, time, and cost of a lawsuit--including (since you'd be suing for personal injury or illness) hiring a doctor or other medical expert to testify, which can be expensive. You should consult with a personal injury attorney to discuss the case and evalute if, given what you might get back vs. what it may cost, it is worthwhile pursuing.


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