If I got an estimate from a company to replace the screens on my porch but never agreed to have them do the work, can I be charged if they came anyway and replaced them?

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If I got an estimate from a company to replace the screens on my porch but never agreed to have them do the work, can I be charged if they came anyway and replaced them?

I told them the estimate was too high, that I was getting another estimate, and would let them know my decision. I never confirmed the work to be done. By their own admission they put me on the schedule without any confirmation from me and then did not remove me from the schedule. I came hone from work one day to find they were in the process of replacing my screens. here was no contract – verbal or written. Now they expect me to pay for the work which I never contracted to be done. Do I owe them anything?

Asked on July 5, 2015 under General Practice, North Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

If there was no agreement to hire them to do this--i.e. no agreement to pay them for replacing your screens--then legally, you do not owe them any money: no one can come to your place, do work without a contract or other agreement, then force you to pay.

Practically, even though on the facts you describe, you'd likely win in court, they *could* file a lawsuit (it's almost impossible to stop someone from filing a lawsuit) for the amount they believe they are owed and force you to spend and possibly money (if you hired an attorney) defending the suit. Depending the quality of the work and what the screens cost, you may wish to try to settle with them rather than go through litigation.


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