What to do if I got a speeding ticket 50 in a 35 zone and I’m strongly interested in fighting this in court?

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What to do if I got a speeding ticket 50 in a 35 zone and I’m strongly interested in fighting this in court?

I’ve never got a ticket before. Is this a good idea or should I take the 2 point reduction and plead guilty? I really would like a dismissal.

Asked on April 27, 2015 under Criminal Law, Colorado

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You have a couple of different options.

The first one is to hire a ticket defense attorney-- or at least consult with one.  They will usually know the options available in your particular jurisdiction.

Your second option is to look online at the court's website.  Some ticket courts will often offer plea agreements where you can enter some type of conditional plea, pay a fine, but still "earn" a dismissal.  In these jurisdictions, you really don't need to hire a ticket defense attorney-- because the court practice accomplishes much of the goal for you.

Your third option is to simply request a trial.  A good number of people actually avoid traffic tickets because the officers are so busy that they don't appear for court.  The risk of this option is that if the officer does appear, that the courts will quite often side with the officer an you will be convicted. 

The bottom line is to explore all of your options before you make any final decisions. 


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