What to do if I had very expensive dental work performed but the dentist avoided clarifying payment records only asking for more payments?

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What to do if I had very expensive dental work performed but the dentist avoided clarifying payment records only asking for more payments?

He demanded a full payment far before the job was over. When according to my records the job was paid in full, dentist still demanded more money, saying that otherwise he’ll postpone my work for n a few months. Did he have a right to demand the full payment before the job was over? Did he have a right to threaten me to stop finishing my work?

Asked on January 25, 2013 under Malpractice Law, New York

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

The agreement that you made as to payment was a cotnract between you.  You could have not agreed to pay him in full but instead you did and unfortunately it sounds like you did so without proof. He does not have a right to stop work if payment was in full.  His claim of course ids that it was not padi.  Yours is that it was.   What you need to do is to send him a letter by certified mail equesting a complete and accurate accounting of the work performed and the payments made.  Once you have it then I would seek help from both a lawyer and another dentist to see if payment made was customary for the work done and really just where things stand.  You may have to sue. Good luck.

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Whether or not your dentist was allowed to demand full payment for the dental work on you before the procedure was completed depends upon what was stated in any invoice or other document sent you. If there is no writing stating payment periods such was an error on the dentist's part and you two need to have a meeting to work out an acceptable payment schedule.

What you have written about is not a legal matter per se but rather an in house accounting issue with your dentist.


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