What can I do if I’m being billed for a bill that I already paid in full?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What can I do if I’m being billed for a bill that I already paid in full?

I called several veterinarians to have my pet’s teeth cleaned. One of them quoted me in the range of $350 so I made the appointment. They increased the amount to $559 while I was at their office and I agreed to proceed. I picked up my pet, paid the amount ($559) in full and I have the receipt to prove it was paid in full. Three months later I decided to have my pet’s medical records faxed to another vet. A few days later, I received another invoice from the vet that I paid $559. They falsely claim, I prepaid them the check of $559 prior to having the work done and I left without paying the remaining amount. Am I obligated to pay the additional amount they are charging me.

Asked on June 16, 2015 under Business Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

This is fundamentally a factual question: what was the agreed-upon price--$559, or some larger amount, of which you paid $559 in advance or as a deposit? To get the money from you, if you refuse to pay, they'd have to be able to prove in court that they did not quote you a price of $559, but rather some larger amount; they can try to do this by testimony (e.g. by their office  manager testifying that the price was $X), but you could interpose your own testimony to the contrary and the court will weigh who is more credible. And if you have any documentary evidence on your side--such as a receipt marked "paid in full" or the like--it would be *very* difficult for them to overcome that. That being the case, if you feel confident of your position, you might refuse to pay; and if you have documentation on your side, send them a copy of it, sent some way you can prove delivery, stating that you have paid in full as proven by the documents and that if they pursue you for the money, you will countersue for abuse of process (improperly using the legal system). Then all you can do is wait to see if they do try to sue; and if they do, defend on the basis of the facts and possibly countersue as well.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption