If I burned myself on the job and have a huge scar from it, what is a fair amount to ask for?

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If I burned myself on the job and have a huge scar from it, what is a fair amount to ask for?

I had 3rd degree burns in my left wrist and it has permanent pigment change.I never missed any work and all medical bills and meds were paid for they r just wanting to settle pain and suffering and mental anguish. Workers comp insurance wants to settle the claim. I just want to get a fair settlement out of the deal not a fortune.

Asked on August 4, 2011 Ohio

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Your personal injuries for the severe burn on your left writs and residual scarring are work related injuries subject to your state's worker's compensation laws since your employer had worker's compensation insurance in effect for all employees when the accident occured resulting in your injuries.

If you have a worker's compensation attorney representing you over your claim, you need to defer to him or her over what the residual value of the scarring is on your left wrist assuming your injuries have completely healed for final settlement purposes.

If you do not have one, you should consult with one regarding the value of the residual scarring for settlement purposes. There is no hard and fast rule to set a value for your scarred wrist. In California, depending upon the injury, pain and suffering is usually a multiplier of 2x the special damages of a person (wage loss and medical bills). In your situation you have scarring which would increase the multiplier amount higher in my opinion.

Good luck.

 

 


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