If I bought a home with a new roof and it turns out to be bad, what options do I have?

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If I bought a home with a new roof and it turns out to be bad, what options do I have?

I purchased a house two years ago next month. The problem I’m having is the roof is leaking. One of the reasons why I chose this house is because the roof was only 2 months old. I had a insurance adjuster come out to see if they could help me and the guy said that he would help, but this is the worst roof job he’s ever seen. Since it wasn’t installed correctly he couldn’t do anything about it. I then proceeded to look over my purchase documents and noticed that they had the same problem. The master bathroom (and other places) was leaking so they did the roof. I now currently have spackling off the ceiling and the paint on the wall is bubbled out. Also, water stains and looks to be black mold. Is there anything I can do other than pay to fix it myself?

Asked on April 19, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If the home that you purchased with a relatively new roof on it is leaking, you should consult with an attorney that practices real estate law in that you may have legal recourse against the sellers of the property and most importantly the roofer for the damages that you will incur in having the roof fixed properly.

I recommend that you consult with the suggested real estate attorney sooner rather than later due to statute of limitations issues. In the meantime, you should have several licensed roofing contractors inspect the roof of your home and give you estimates for its repair.


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