What canI do if my employer cut my hours due to my pregnancy?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What canI do if my employer cut my hours due to my pregnancy?

I have been working at my job for 2 years with no problems. I found out that I am pregnant. I couldn’t go to work for a week because of a pregnancy issue. When I came back to work today the boss told me that they cut my hours by half. I used to work 40 hours a week now she said I will only work 20 hours a week. When I asked why she said that they have money problems, however, only my hours have been cut. I truly feel she did this to make me quit because I am pregnant. What can I do?  Should I speak with am employment law attorney? I live in Broward County,
FL.

Asked on August 18, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

Antonios Poulos / POULOS LAW

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Yes. This is a common issue facing many pregnant employees across the country. Many employers upon learning of an employee's pregnancy seek to cut hours or job responsibilities in the hopes of the employee quiting before they take their leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act. Keep in mind that employers have a great deal of discretion in how they distribute hours. So, a one time reduction in hours may just be due to the currect economic environment facing many businesses. However, if there is a consistent pattern of a reduction in your hours alone, you should seek a consultation with an employment attorney.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You should speak with an employment attorney, since you may have a discrimination or harassment claim. Employers may not discriminate against pregnant women. Certain reasonable changes, necessitated by the nature of the employer's available work, are allowed--for example, if a pregnant woman had trouble standing for long periods, she could be moved from a job that required extensive standing, even if that meant cutting hours. Or she could be moved from a job that exposed her to potentially hazardous conditions. However, in the absence of an accomodation required by the combination of the preganancy and the available work, employers should not discriminate against pregnant women. From what you write, it would be worth consulting with an employment attorney (many will provide a free initial consultation). Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption