If I am the person who got rear-ended and the other driver’s insurer wants a pay stub from me so that it can pay my lost wages, does that sound right?

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If I am the person who got rear-ended and the other driver’s insurer wants a pay stub from me so that it can pay my lost wages, does that sound right?

Do I give them the info? Also, I have a paper that they want me to sign. It is an “Authorization for Disclosure of Medical Information”. There is a sentence in it I do not understand. It says, “I understand that Provider may not condition treatment. payment, enrollment or eligibility for benefits on my agreement to this authorization unless otherwise permitted by law.” What does this mean?

Asked on April 10, 2014 under Personal Injury, Florida

Answers:

Micah Longo / The Longo Firm

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

The insurance company looking to verify your lost wages.  The easiest way to do this is by providing a paystub.  This is normal and reasonable.

As per the language you cite, I would be weary signing anything the at-faul party's insurance carrier wants you to sign.  I suggest you contact a personal injury attorney to review and explain the documents.  

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

1) It's perfectly reasonably and normal to require proof of what your wages are (i.e. pay stub) before paying lost wages--they do not have to simply take your word for what you earn.

2) The language you quote means that the medical provider cannot without treatment, or only seek payment for treatment rendered, based on your signing the agreement.


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