If I am employed by a board of directors and one director called me a b—- during an open public meeting, what action can I take?

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If I am employed by a board of directors and one director called me a b—- during an open public meeting, what action can I take?

The president says he wrote a letter to the board member. He does not plan to take any action against this director. The same man made a racial slur to a fellow employee. There are only 2 of us working here.

Asked on April 11, 2012 under Personal Injury, Texas

Answers:

Richard Weaver / The Weaver Law Firm

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

This is horrible. Could this be related to a racial discrimination claim? It would be important to examine further details and the past history of the employer.

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Based on the limited facts that you have described, any possible remedies will probably be limited to internal employment procedures.  Calling someone a b--- only qualifies as a hostile work environment if it's part of a continued and repetitive series of events.  To perfect a claim for a sexual or racial harassment claim, you have to show that you are a member of a protected class and that the name calling was related to a pattern of discrimination.  Two events with no other adverse actions are probably not going to get you there.  That doesn't mean that you don't have a discrimination or hostile work environment claim, it's just that the facts as you describe them just don't quite get you there.  Most employers have handbooks, inclusion policies, or hostile work environment policies underwhich you can file a grievance with your employer-- which is your only rememdy unless there are other facts.


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