Can I liable for someone else’s vandalism if a friend I was with accidentally caused damage to mall property?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I liable for someone else’s vandalism if a friend I was with accidentally caused damage to mall property?

My friend reached up and hit an exit sign at the mall causing it to break. He did not intend on breaking the sign it was simply an accident. However, a day later the mall security emailed me claiming that I am liable for the damages incurred on their sign just because they saw me with him in the surveillance video. They managed to obtain my information through a coupon I used that same day and are threatening that they are going to seek further legal action against me. I don’t feel I should be liable for something I had nothing to do with considering that I’m not his mother or related.

Asked on August 6, 2011 Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Unless you were knowingly a part of the alleged vandalism by your friend you are not responsible for his conduct and the resulting damages. Meaning, if your friend's wrongful conduct occurred out of the blue and as a surprise to you, then your should not be responsible for his conduct.

However, if you and your friend went to the mall with the intent to cause damage, his wrongful conduct and damage caused would be under the eyes of the law, your wrongful conduct and damage.

Mall security is attempting to pressure you to give information about your friend who caused the problem. I would not respond to the mall security's e mail in that your response may incriminate you in the event criminal charges are filed against you.

You should contact your friend and advise him that he needs to pay for the sign that he damaged. Payment for the damages he caused in the right thing to do.

Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption