I am being accused of buying drugs at work.

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I am being accused of buying drugs at work.

A receptionist was caught on tape stealing Tramadol. I am a recovering addict and have been clean and sober for 3 years. He pulled me and the office manager in his office and said I was acting suspicious and that he thinks I was buying the Tramadol from this girl. I am getting him my monthly drug test but I did not buy or have anything to do with daid tramadol and want to take a lie detector test as well. He has no proof only that I acted suspicious I used the restroom after her and because we were the only 2 left in the building I told her I’d wait to make sure she’d get to her car safe it was broad daylight but still. I got in my car pulled up to the door and waited she took forever I was about to leave when she finally emerged to which I said I was glad she was there because my car battery died that morning she walked to my car lot a cigarette then walked away. No drug exchange but he said it looked suspicious.

Asked on November 17, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

If you did buy or use drugs at work, or were impaired or high at work, you could be terminated, of course. But that is not what you describe; you describe a situation where you are accused without evidence. If you employer knows you are a recovering addict and that is why you accused, this may be illegal discrimination: the law prohibits harassing or discriminating against persons due to disabilities or medical conditions, and addiction is considered an illness. So if you have done nothing wrong but action is taken against you due to your condition, you may have a disability discrimination claim, and should contact the EEOC about filing a complaint.


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