What to do if I am a white woman and one of my supervisors is a black woman and she told me the other day she has recently become racist towards whites?

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What to do if I am a white woman and one of my supervisors is a black woman and she told me the other day she has recently become racist towards whites?

She gave me a bad review saying I try to find ways of getting out of doing my job. When I asked for proof she told my supervisors that I use the bathroom too much. She is constantly harassing me and gives me all the crap work that she doesn’t feel like doing. She lets the filing pile up to the sky and won’t let me file until it gets out of control. She has also gotten up in my face in the bathroom and threatened me. I told her supervisor (he is white) and he tells me this is all my fault. I have filed with the EEOC because my employer has done nothing to resolve this.

Asked on January 9, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Maryland

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Discrimination or harassment in employment on the basis of race is illegal. That does not mean that, for example, an African American supervisor cannot criticize, write up, take negative action against, etc. a caucasion employee--just that she cannot do this because of the employee's race.

If you believe that you are suffering from racial discrimination or harassment, you can file a complaint with the EEOC and/or with the equivalent state agency in your state; or you can speak with an emplyment law attorney about possibly filing a lawsuit. If you've already spoken with the EEOC and are not satisfied with the response, you might try talking to an attorney.


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