What to do if I’m working with a home improvement contractor who has completed a renovation of our house but never pulled permits?

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What to do if I’m working with a home improvement contractor who has completed a renovation of our house but never pulled permits?

He renovated the living room, kitchen, master bedroom and bathroom. He did not pull permits and says we told him not to. Now we have received a “stop work order” from the county codes department. To perform an electrical inspection, there is a variety of work involved, including taking down drywall and then putting it back. He has said he does not want to be involved anymore and wants us to pay subcontractors directly (electrician, drywall repair). Likewise, there is a triple fee on all permits. What is he liable to pay for and what are we liable to pay for? Likewise, when are we responsible for offering a final payment to him?

Asked on December 14, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Given what you have written about your contractor has a problem in that permits were required to be first obtained before work was started on your property. The work needed to pull apart the unit and then proceed is to be paid for by the general contractor. I suggest that you may want to get a real estate attorney experienced with construction law involved.


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