I am a teacher who was hospitalized recently for an undiagnosis brain trauma the school reported to my students on my condition, do I have legal grounds for a suit?

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I am a teacher who was hospitalized recently for an undiagnosis brain trauma the school reported to my students on my condition, do I have legal grounds for a suit?

All of my students said the same thing, they were told by administration and the substitute teacher that I had had an aneurysm, frontal brain bleed, stroke, was going to a mental institution for at least 6 months and would not be back this year. I was out of hospital in a week and recovered and cleared to return to work after two.

Asked on December 29, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

No, you do not have grounds for a lawsuit for this: there is no law prohibiting a school (or other employer) from informing students (or other interested parties) about an injury occuring to a teacher (or other employee). While they were wrong, there is no evidence in what you write that they did this deliberately to harm you--rather, it appears to have been an overreaction and poor communication, not an act of harassment, bullying, etc. The law does not provide compensation for an unfortunate release of information if such was not specifically prohibited by law and was not done with an intention to harm. Moreover, even if the school were liable for having released the information, you'd have to prove that the release caused you some actual, quantifiable harm in order to recover compenstion, since the law only provide compensation for provable, actual harm, costs, or losses.


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