What constitutes a case for harrassment in the workplace?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What constitutes a case for harrassment in the workplace?

We unfortunately had to file bankruptcy 7 years ago our home was not reaffirmed but we have been making our payments each month. A few weeks ago my manager was yelling at me and using profanity in front of other associates. I reported him to our GM and district HR office. I was informed by my manager that I would be held accountable. Since then I have been receiving emails threatening write-ups and with sugestions that I should leave the company. I have been refused when requesting a day off to see a doctor after being sick for over a week, being told that it would not be excused even with a doctor’s note. Now this week I’m scheaduled closing shifts all week and even though I have been approved to take a vacation day they have still scheduled me 40 hours. I am debating leaving the company. Do I have a case for harrasment?

Asked on October 14, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Hawaii

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Harassment in the workplace is any conduct that is socially unacceptable intended to cause a targeted person to feel threatened, annoyed or uncomfortable that has no redeeming social value. From what you have written about, you are being retaliated against and harassed due to having a co-employee written up for unacceptable behavior. What is happening to you is not acceptable.

I suggest that you report what is happening to your human resources department and your nearest representative for the department of labor.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption