What should I do if I’m a recently self-employed personal trainer and one of my clients was injured but I have no insurance to cover this?

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What should I do if I’m a recently self-employed personal trainer and one of my clients was injured but I have no insurance to cover this?

I do not have insurance covering injuries to my clients, as I have always worked for a gym. I have never had a problem in my 20 year long career but now a client wants to sue me. She claims to have hurt her back doing a push up, yet did not express any discomfort at the time and I wasn’t informed until 3 days later that she was injured. The client is aware of the insurance circumstances and I have been told me to “take out a loan” as they wish to be compensated for medical bills, as well as tuition for school that she was unable to attend due to her injury. To my knowledge, the party is not currently represented by an attorney. They have asked to meet with me to discuss the situation.

Asked on July 17, 2014 under Personal Injury, Connecticut

Answers:

Richard Southard / Law Office of Richard Southard

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

This is not a problem that can be handled on your own. Do not compound the mistake of not having insurance with negotiating with this client.  She may record your conversation and try to use it against you. She may not have a lawyer because a lawyer may not want to invest money in what might be a weak case.  Hire an aggressive defense attorney and hope she backs down. 


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