If I am a freelancer working without a contract and fighting to get paid, do I have any legal recourse?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I am a freelancer working without a contract and fighting to get paid, do I have any legal recourse?

I am a freelancer and began working on a commissioned project for a client. As this client was a friend of a friend I didn’t make them sign a contract before beginning work. I have, however, several times tried to nail down a budget and agreement on cost. It has now been more than 2 months and the client still ignores any inquiries about budget and wont agree to a final price. He’s admitted he is broke and has asked to pay $100 a month and “just keep an eye on the total” while still not agreeing to a price. My 2 counter offers have been ignored. I’m owed $2k. Do I have any legal recourse?

Asked on April 6, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Since it appears you did work without a contract and without a set price, then you really only have the legal recourse of suing and showing what your project is worth. If you can show emails or letters or text messages unequivocally coming from the client showing the agreed upon price, you might have a better shot at getting your $2,000.00. If no contract and the court decides that there was no meeting of the minds or a bargained for exchange from both parties, be prepared for a little rough justice and something much less than $2,000.00 as your pay out. Try to nail down something in the next month showing this person did indeed agree to a set price or hourly rate with or without a cap and then sue. Depending on your state's small claims claim cap, you might be able to get this matter into small claims court (much simpler than civil court).


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption