Can I due an auto repair chain for lying about work that needed to be done on my car?

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Can I due an auto repair chain for lying about work that needed to be done on my car?

I went to a national auto repair chain and paid them $100 to perform a “diagnostic” check on my car, because it was doing some weird things. They gave me a printout with repairs that need to be performed totaling $1,000. I told them that I would bring it back because I couldn’t afford it right then. One of the issues is that it said my car needed a new thermostat and sensor. I then took it for a second opinion and I was told that none of what the first repair shop told me was true. I was informed at the second place that the problem is electrical and that I need to take it to an electrical company. The info was free. Can I sue the first repair shop for lying?

Asked on April 28, 2011 under General Practice, Indiana

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

What you have here are conflicting expert opinions, one you chose to pay for and one who chose to give it to you for free.  You can try and sue - you would sue in small claims court - but you will need the second auto repair place to come in and testify that none ofthe issues from the print out were real and that the problem was electrical.  Or bring some kind of affidavit from the second place that says the same thing.  You would be suing for misrepresentation and fraud.  Then I would bring something supporting from the electrical company as well. This is not really an easy case to prove.  Good luck to you. 


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