What can I do if I’m a college student and slipped on ice on campus and injured myself?

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What can I do if I’m a college student and slipped on ice on campus and injured myself?

I was walking back from class at 9 pm. When I exited the building that I was in, I slipped and fell on ice which was right outside the door. I turned my ankle and couldn’t get up. An ambulance had to be called and they drove me to the emergency room where they took X-rays and said that I had badly sprained my ankle. A month later, I am still dealing with the effects of this injury and I received my medical bill which totaled $1,100. Will I be able to recover the cost of my medical expenses from the school?

Asked on March 25, 2015 under Personal Injury, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

You *might* be able to recover you medical costs: that depends on whether the school was negligent, or unreasonably careless, in not clearning, salting, etc. the ice. That in turn depends on whether, under the circumstances, it would have been reasonable for them to have cleared the ice. That in turn depends on the specific circumstances or facts, such as was it obvious or should it have been obvious that there was ice (you don't have to clear it if there's no reason to know that it's there); how long since it had iced over (since there must be sufficient time to have cleared the ice); was the school taking reasonable steps to clear ice and just hadn't gotten to that patch yet (if they were in the process of clearning, they are allowed a reasonable time to get it done); etc. Thus, you may have a claim, or you may not--it is possible, but again, depends on whether, under the facts, the school was negligent, or unreasonably careless, in not clearing the ice.


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