Hwo many years do i have to go to school for criminal law?

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Hwo many years do i have to go to school for criminal law?

Asked on May 4, 2009 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I assume you are asking how do I become a criminal attorney, because there is no school just for criminal law.  In order to become lawyer you would have to graduate from college and then attend law school for 3 years. You would then have to take and pass the bar for the state in which you want to practice.

Welcome aboard.

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

Depending on what level degree you are talking about the answer is probably 7 on top of graduating high school.

Once you graduate from High School you can choose to major in any degree you would like, many people choose pre-law or criminal justice, English, political science. Again that is discretionary. This is a 4 year degree although you can do it in a shorter period if you attend summer courses and take a full plus course load every semester.

You than have to attend law school. This is generally a 3 year degree. Upon graduation you must take and pass the bar exam.

 

To become an attorney you do not major in one area, although many schools offer certification programs in areas such as criminal law.

 

In a nutshell it is 7 years post High School


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