HR wants informatoin on a chronic condition I have.

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HR wants informatoin on a chronic condition I have.

I have arthritis I have had it since I was two and manager my condition with medication and an outpatient infusion once a month. Other then that one day a month the only times I take off for work are normal dr and dentist appointments. I have never taken time off work nor have I ever hinted I would. I work more then 40 hours a week as a preschool teacher managing my staff and class room. I walk and move very stiffly and my hands look like I am 80 so its obvious I have a condition but it does not effect how I work.

The email I got from HR stated that due to other employees with similar conditions have requested leave they have to treat me the same way and now want to know if I will have to miss work for my condition for set appointments. The only set appointment I have is my infusion and I use my sick or vacation time for that and I always prepare my staff that I will be gone. A

Do I have to discus my condition with HR or can I tell them its none of there business.

Asked on October 29, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

It is none of their business unless and until 1) it demonstrably affects your work (e.g. output, deadlines, quality), 2) you ask for leave (instead of just using your PTO), or 3) you ask for a "reasonable accommodation." Until it actually affects your employer, it is not their concern, and arguably inquiring into employee health when there is no business impact is a violation of the disability discrimination laws.


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