How to get the insurance company to reimburse me money for double payments on a life insurance policy.

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How to get the insurance company to reimburse me money for double payments on a life insurance policy.

I have paid double premiums on a life insurance polcy. The money has been paid by money orders and by a bank draft coming from my personal bank account. I made copies of all money orders and copies of the bank statements from the bank and sent a letter to the insurance company asking for reimbursement of overpayment, I have called weekly and still the company gives me a different answer each time, but will not give an answer as to where the money is. THE money orders were sent to a field office, the field representative acknowledges receiving the money orders but not the bank drafts, the main office acknowledges receiving the bank drafts but not the money orders.

Asked on November 28, 2018 under Insurance Law, Maryland

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

You can sue for the return of of the money: the law is clear that they cannot keep more money than you agreed to pay and so they are entitled to. You would sue the insurance company, the field office if it is an independent office, and the field office representative who accepted or received the payments personally (in case he or she is diverting or pocketing some of the money). Bear in mind that you can only sue for double or overpayments going back up to three years, because this would be a legal action based on contract (the insurance policy is a contract), and in your state (MD), the "statute of limitations," or time period within which you must file or initiate a legal action, based on contract is only three years. Therefore, you cannot sue for any overpayments, double payments, etc. which occured more than three years ago.


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