How to find out if my children or Iwere the beneficiaries on my stepdad’s life insurance policy?

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How to find out if my children or Iwere the beneficiaries on my stepdad’s life insurance policy?

My stepdad died last month and I was told by someone he had a policy and that either my 2 minor children or I are the beneficiaries. How do I go about finding out if we were on the policy and which company he was with because all of his paperwork he had, his girlfriend now has and she won’t let me see; she thought he was leaving stuff to her.

Asked on August 12, 2011 Maryland

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Well, you need to tread lightly regarding this because if she has any animosity there may be potential for forgery or possibility that she would pretend to be the children's guardians. It happens a lot so be careful how you go about finding out the information. You can certainly have a lawyer draft a letter to her explaining she must give you copies of those insurance policies in order to determine if indeed one of you is the beneficiary but understand you may not be automatically entitled to know who is the beneficiary. Ultimately, insurance companies are tasked with the responsibility of locating those beneficiaries but if the minors are listed, it may be a bit difficult. Try getting a list of licensed insurance companies in your state (if this is where your step-father lived) by contacting the Insurance Department and cold call each company about how to find out if a) this person had a policy with that company and b) if the company can inform you whether or not you or your children is the beneficiary.


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