How often can my landlord come to carry out a general inspection?

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How often can my landlord come to carry out a general inspection?

That is to just wander around the rooms; no specific reason given or concern identified.

Asked on July 24, 2011 Georgia

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

A tenant has the right to the exclusive use of the leased premises.  In GA, however, a landlord has the automatic right to enter a property if it is necessary to prevent destruction or respond to an emergency; under these circumstances the landlord can do so without prior notice.  Also, a tenant can always give a landlord permission to enter if they are home and agree to do so.

As to entry for other reasons, first you need to check your lease.  A landlord may be given the right to enter to show the premises to a prospective tenant, mortgagee and related professional (e.g. an appraiser) or to allow the landlord to make repairs and do maintenance, etc. (unless a lack of such maintenance will result in the destruction of the property as mentioned above).  Notice requirements should be spelled out; typically there are a minimum of 24 hours; 8:00 am - 5:00 pm; Monday - Friday).

If the lease does not state that the landlord can enter the apartment, a tenant could legally refuse the landlord access. However, it is best for all parties concerned to discuss the matter and reach a mutually acceptable solution.


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