How much personal information do I have to supply my insurance company for an auto theft?

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How much personal information do I have to supply my insurance company for an auto theft?

My vehicle was stolen in the middle of the
night from my home. When I noticed in the
morning I filed a report with the police, then
a claim with my insurance company. When the
insurance company called me back they had sent
my claim straight to the theft and fire special
investigation team. The representative for
progressive asked me to send them copies of my,
phone records, bank statements, credit report,
receipts from parts purchases, and have called
and talked to the other occupants of my house
hold.

Asked on April 24, 2018 under Insurance Law, Indiana

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

If you don't provide them the information they seek, they will refuse to pay your claim. You could then try to sue them for "breach of contract"--for not honoring the obligation(s) in their policy--for the money. However, in that lawsuit, they will request the same information using the legal mechanisms of "discovery" and will be able to get it if they can show *any* relevance whatsoever. Since theft claims involve the possibility that you collaborated in the "theft" (e.g. sold it a "chop shop" and placed an insurance claim; paid someone to steal it so you could file a claim; etc.), information as to your contacts and finances may very well be considered relevant by a court--i.e. there is a reasonable chance they would get this information in a lawsuit, anyway. Assuming this is a legitimate claim, you may wish to simply redact any particularly sensitive information (e.g. your bank account number) and provide.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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