How many days before the end of my lease can my landlord start showing the property to prospective buyers? I live in Florida.

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How many days before the end of my lease can my landlord start showing the property to prospective buyers? I live in Florida.

My landlord started showing the property multiple times a week almost
every other day and I am a stay at home mom. I still have 5 months left and
it is becoming a little frustrating because I feel like my privacy is constantly
being invaded. Is there a law in Florida that can limit the amount of times a
week or that they can only start showing 60 days before the end of my
contract?

Asked on February 26, 2018 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There is no hard and fast or readily defined limit unless your lease provides one. Your landlord's limitation is that he may only show the home a "reasonable" number of times, during "reasonable" hours. Every other day for an extended period is almost certainly not reasonable, so the landlord is likely violating his obligation to allow you the "quiet enjoyment" of the property you are renting. The problem you have is that practically, there is no good way to vindicate your rights: you can withhold rent over the violation to force him to stop showing so often, then have the landlord try to evict you and have to defend your action by convincing a court this was an unreasonable violation of your right to quiet enjoyment and that you were justified. Or you could move out early and potentially be sued by your landlord for the rent for the rest of the term, then again, have to defend yourself in  court by convincing a judge that the landlord's actions were so unreasonable as to justify early termination. In either event, you'd need a judge to agree with you or you could face liability; but because what is "reasonable" is subjective (again, no hard-and-fast measure), a judge could disagree and find for the landord. Thus, while it seems that the landlord is in the wrong, enforcing your rights is not risk free for you.


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