How long will it take to be evicted?

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How long will it take to be evicted?

I have rented at this property for over 2 years. The lease expired over a year ago and there has been no problem with month-to-month. One day the landlord asked about a increase; I said that I was not able and she proceeded with a 50% increases with no grace period. She has found new tenants and want us out, however we do not have any other options. A couple of months have gone by and we pay the previous amount and wait for the legal notice. How long before we’re forced out and under what grounds? We are good tenants and have done many unappreciated improvements.

Asked on September 14, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Connecticut

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You are doing the right thing by paying the rent on time and continuously.  And if she keeps accepting the rental income then you keep buying yourself at lease another 2 months (the month you paid for and the next month for what would be the required notice).  But should the landlord stop accepting the rent then start to really give thought to moving.  Generally and in most states, as a month to month tenant the landlord has to give you at least 30 days notice to vacate the apartment and can not accept the rental income from you during the time frame that deals with service of the 30 day notice and the commencement of the eviction proceedings.   Could you possibly negotiate a smaller increase in order to stay? Realistically the landlord will lose 2 months rent and the "new" tenants will probably not wait around for the apartment for that long so maybe even more in rent.  It will take your landlord a long time to recoup that money so maybe appeal t their greedier side.  Good luck.


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