How long does the eviction process take?

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How long does the eviction process take?

I lost my job and am 3 days late on my rent. I am paying month-to-month because my lease expired a year ago. I received a 3 day notice to pay or quit but I thought that renters were usually given a 30 day notice to pay. How long does the eviction process take in FL? How much time will I have to come up with my rent? Can I pay half of the rent to avoid eviction? I have also had many issues in the past with my landlord not fixing things in the house in a timely manner (it usually takes her months to fix things). I was thinking that I could mention this if I had to write an appeal to court.

Asked on December 12, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

A 3 day notice to pay or quit is a different process than a 30 day evcition notice. In a 3 day notice, the landlord is giving the tenant the option to continue on with the lease as opposed to ending it. All the tenant has to do under a 3 day notice to keep from being evicted is pay what is owed in the 3 day period.

If you do not pay your rent owed in the 3 day time period, the landlord could file an unlawful detainer action against you, have you served with the summons and complaint and then you get a court date after you answer the complaint in roughly 45 days.

Assuming you lose the unlawful detainer hearing the judge will give the tenant about 10 days to vacate the rental.

I suggest that you meet with your landlord to try and work an arrangement so you can stay in the rental. Make sure all agreements are in writing and signed by the landlord for future need and reference.


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