How long does a creditor or a collection agenthave to supply proof of debt?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How long does a creditor or a collection agenthave to supply proof of debt?

My ex-boyfriend got a credit card fraudulently in my name and maxed it out. When the credit card company contacted me, I demanded proof and was never supplied any. I disputed this with the credit bureau and demanded proof of my responsibility. No proof was ever given yet I was told the debt is still my responsibility. The credit card company now has a lawyer contacting me. The law office has no proof of my responsibility to the credit card and requested this proof over 30 days ago from the credit card company with no response. How long does a law office have to supply me proof of this debt?

Asked on January 4, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Alaska

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you are being contacted by a credit card company's lawyer over some debt that you are not responsible for (where a former boyfriend obtained a credit card in your name without your knowledge and consent and made unauthorized charges on it) and you are not getting the answer to your questions provided along with documentation that the debt is your responsibility, I suggest that you consult with an attorney that practices in the area of consumer debt litigation.

From what you have written, it appears that you are not going to get the answers you need directly from the lawyer that you have been in contact with. This lawyer really has no time frame to provide you with the desired information.

If the claimed creditor had a good claim against you, you would have suspected that you would have been provided the requested information in a timely manner.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption